drdavidmrmack:

Now that the DVD is out, I can finally share with you the end credits for CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER film that I did the art for working with Sarofsky Design. My official credit in the film for it is: Illustrator/Concept Artist. Here, ART OF THE TITLE presents the sequence. I drew the images by hand. Working on the sequence with designer Sarofsky. And then my drawings were scanned, vectorized, and brought to life by a team of 3D animators at Sarofsky studios in Chicago. Then with the incredible music and type and editing… I’m very happy with this. You can watch the complete title sequence at the link.

artofthetitle:

New this week!

For Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Sarofsky Corp. craft one of Marvel’s boldest title sequence efforts to date.

Watch the Captain America: The Winter Soldier sequence on Art of the Title

proteesiukkonen:


I Am a Bride

A short comic inspired by Finnish werewolf folklore in which it is many times the wedding couple and/or the entire wedding party that is bewitched to turn into wolves by a resentful guest or family member.
proteesiukkonen:


I Am a Bride

A short comic inspired by Finnish werewolf folklore in which it is many times the wedding couple and/or the entire wedding party that is bewitched to turn into wolves by a resentful guest or family member.
proteesiukkonen:


I Am a Bride

A short comic inspired by Finnish werewolf folklore in which it is many times the wedding couple and/or the entire wedding party that is bewitched to turn into wolves by a resentful guest or family member.

proteesiukkonen:

I Am a Bride

A short comic inspired by Finnish werewolf folklore in which it is many times the wedding couple and/or the entire wedding party that is bewitched to turn into wolves by a resentful guest or family member.

superdames:

davidjcutler:

comicsalliance:

A BELATED BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION OF THE GREAT RAMONA FRADON

By Patrick A. Reed

Ramona Fradon is one of the great living legends of comics, a creator with an instantly recognizable style who has worked on some of DC Comics‘ best-loved series — and co-created a few classic characters along the way. Her crisp, lyrical line has elevated every book she’s touched over her six-and-a-half decades in the business, and her work continues to influence and inspire creators to this day.

Fradon graduated from Parsons School Of Design in 1950, and began working at DC almost immediately, pencilling the Shining Knight backup story in Adventure Comics #165 – and when that feature was replaced by Aquaman two issues later, Fradon found her first signature character.

To mark the occasion of Fradon’s recent birthday, we’ve compiled a small gallery of her art, and assembled a few friends to join us in celebrating her life and work.

READ MORE

One of the unsung silver age greats.

Artist of one of my favorite Fantastic Four stories in which Thundra gleefully beats up the Thing. Here’s my meager Ramona Fradon tag.

pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.

And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. 

Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).
ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).

ca-tsuka:

The Legend of Zelda original concept art by Katsuya Terada (Blood the last Vampire).

davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.
davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.

davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.

icalledyoudumb:

myideaoffuniskillingeveryone:

Danny Galieote

I would frame and hang these in my house in a heartbeat.
icalledyoudumb:

myideaoffuniskillingeveryone:

Danny Galieote

I would frame and hang these in my house in a heartbeat.
icalledyoudumb:

myideaoffuniskillingeveryone:

Danny Galieote

I would frame and hang these in my house in a heartbeat.
icalledyoudumb:

myideaoffuniskillingeveryone:

Danny Galieote

I would frame and hang these in my house in a heartbeat.
icalledyoudumb:

myideaoffuniskillingeveryone:

Danny Galieote

I would frame and hang these in my house in a heartbeat.

icalledyoudumb:

myideaoffuniskillingeveryone:

Danny Galieote

I would frame and hang these in my house in a heartbeat.

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.